Showing posts tagged depression.
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The conjectural science of the subject

"Depression! Sacrosanct depression! The word is spreading, at a gallop, and rinforzando, the rumor is making its way, the devil, it’s spread all over, and for some days now it’s been haunting the Elysée Palace. From Lisbon, the journalist from Le Monde who covers him, Mr. Philippe Ridet, wrote “Another life is beginning for the chief of State. What president will he be now that he is alone? Depressive, weakened?” One of his counselors wants to reassure us: “The exercise of power”, he says, “will triumph over the depression.” But no, the harm has been done: whatever his entourage might say, the public eye will no longer let him be, it will scrutinize the shades of his pallor, the luster of his eyes, his complexion, the tilt of his head, his gait, the circles under his eyes… Woe to him at the first sign of fatigue! We are henceforth living in a world where good old tiredness no longer exists: it’s the blues, depression, darling, where are you? Quick, my anti-depressor!"
JAM -Depression.

(Source: zizekbadioujam)

— 3 years ago with 14 notes
#Depression  #blue  #fatigue  #mental health  #psych  #psychoanalysis  #lisboa  #depressao 
"Let us keep in mind the speech of the depressed - repetitive and monotonous. Faced with the impossibility of concatenating, they utter sentences that are interrupted, exhausted, come to a standstill. Even phrases they cannot formulate. A repetitive rhythm, a monotonous melody emerge and dominate the broken logical sequences, changing them into recurring, obsessive litanies. Finally, when that frugal musicality becomes exhausted in its turn, or simply does not succeed in becoming established on account of the pressure of silence, the melancholy person appears of asymbolia or the excess of an unorderable cognitive chaos."
Julia Kristeva, Black Sun.

(Source: batarde)

— 3 years ago with 107 notes
#Julia Kristeva  #depression  #melancholy  #depressao  #melancolia  #sol negro  #psychopathology  #psychoanalysis 

Skulls, 1976 print series by Andy Warhol.

Sigmund Freud writes:

"The moment a man questions the meaning and value of life, he is sick, since objectively neither has any existence; by asking this question one is merely admitting to a store of unsatisfied libido to which something else must have happened, a kind of fermentation leading to sadness and depression. I am afraid these explanations of mine are not very wonderful. Perhaps because I am too pessimistic. I have an advertisement floating about in my head which I consider the boldest and most successful piece of American publicity: ‘Why live, if you can be buried for ten dollars?’" (Sigmund Freud in a letter to Marie Bonaparte, 13 August 1937, in Letters of Sigmund Freud 1873-1939).

Skulls, 1976 print series by Andy Warhol.

Sigmund Freud writes:

"The moment a man questions the meaning and value of life, he is sick, since objectively neither has any existence; by asking this question one is merely admitting to a store of unsatisfied libido to which something else must have happened, a kind of fermentation leading to sadness and depression. I am afraid these explanations of mine are not very wonderful. Perhaps because I am too pessimistic. I have an advertisement floating about in my head which I consider the boldest and most successful piece of American publicity: ‘Why live, if you can be buried for ten dollars?’" (Sigmund Freud in a letter to Marie Bonaparte, 13 August 1937, in Letters of Sigmund Freud 1873-1939).

— 3 years ago with 1060 notes
#freud  #meaning of live  #depression  #American publicity  #art  #Andy Warhol  #Skulls 
The U.S. exports plenty of things that much of the world would gladly  send back: the Golden Arches, Jerry Bruckheimer movies and Baywatch, to  name a few. But in addition to the cultural flotsam that drives the rest  of the world crazy, America is literally exporting its mental  illnesses. “In teaching the rest of the world to think like us, we have  been, for better and worse, homogenizing the way the world goes mad,”  writes journalist Ethan Watters. He traces how conditions first widely diagnosed in the U.S., such as anorexia and PTSD, have spread abroad  “with the speed of contagious diseases.” The growth of Big Pharma and  the widespread adoption of U.S. health standards have made the ailing  American psyche the primary diagnostic model. By 2008, for example,  GlaxoSmithKline was selling over $1 billion worth of Paxil a year to the  Japanese, who didn’t know they had a problem with depression until drug  marketers informed them. Though Watters’ indignation can be wearying at  times, he is on to something worth pondering.

The U.S. exports plenty of things that much of the world would gladly send back: the Golden Arches, Jerry Bruckheimer movies and Baywatch, to name a few. But in addition to the cultural flotsam that drives the rest of the world crazy, America is literally exporting its mental illnesses. “In teaching the rest of the world to think like us, we have been, for better and worse, homogenizing the way the world goes mad,” writes journalist Ethan Watters. He traces how conditions first widely diagnosed in the U.S., such as anorexia and PTSD, have spread abroad “with the speed of contagious diseases.” The growth of Big Pharma and the widespread adoption of U.S. health standards have made the ailing American psyche the primary diagnostic model. By 2008, for example, GlaxoSmithKline was selling over $1 billion worth of Paxil a year to the Japanese, who didn’t know they had a problem with depression until drug marketers informed them. Though Watters’ indignation can be wearying at times, he is on to something worth pondering.

— 3 years ago with 13 notes
#mental health  #saude mental  #dsm  #anorexia  #depression  #psyche  #medicine  #psychology  #psicologia  #crazy like us  #japanese 
Imagine Being Allergic to Other

Mesdames, Messieurs —

My hope is that the award will increase attention to the cavalier, haphazard, and sometimes ludicrous ways in which 112 new mental disorders were formally approved in 1980. That year, the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders appeared in the States and around the world, hundreds of pages longer than its previous incarnation, revolutionizing the landscape of mental health decisions in our schools and courts, our prisons and healthcare systems.

One of the most prominent of the new disorders, social phobia, was said to exist if individuals avoided public restrooms, disliked public speaking, and found themselves concerned about spilling food on their ties in a restaurant—that’s, of course, if they happened to wear ties to restaurants. Unfortunately, that’s not a joke. When more than half of any population—including in France and the United States—defines itself as shy, a psychiatric diagnosis that includes fear of public speaking is disturbingly close to making introversion a mental disorder. Close-enough, at least, for the DSM to include a warning about the risks of that confusion. Close-enough, too, for the drug companies to sense a $2 billion dollar global market awaiting them. The consequence? Millions of children and students are now taking, among other antidepressants and antipsychotics, Deroxat—or Paxil, as it’s known in the States (Seroxat in the UK). One has to be “fluent” in pharma-ese, you see, and relentless in the exposure of corporate secrets, to trace a drug’s real-world effects on public health.

[…]I witnessed academic squabbles that would make a five-year-old blush concerning whose research and final suggestions would enter one of the world’s most influential diagnostic manuals. I followed exchanges in which leading psychiatrists wrote to diagnose their critics and opponents with the very disorders they wanted to make official. I tracked arguments, too, for the inclusion of new disorders that not only quoted Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, but also made one feel, like Alice, as if one was either tumbling down an intellectual rabbit-hole or witnessing a mad-hatter’s tea-party.

Chair of the DSM-III task force, Robert Spitzer knocked out the criteria for two mental disorders in minutes. Even startled colleagues were incredulous at his speed. One participant later told the New Yorker magazine (January 2003): “There was very little systematic research [in what we did], and much of the research that existed was really a hodgepodge—scattered, inconsistent and ambiguous. I think the majority of us recognized that the amount of good, solid science upon which we were making our decisions was pretty modest.”

The most surreal aspects of Carroll’s novel of course remain fiction. Unfortunately that is not true of Avoidant Personality Disorder, which became a mental disorder after discussion about it centered on whether diagnosable people preferred driving or taking the train to work (this was in New York City, of course, one of the few cities in the country with a large rail network). Nor is it fiction that the UK-US giant GlaxoSmithKline spent more than $92 million in the year 2000 on a campaign to promote diagnoses of social anxiety disorder. They called it “Imagine Being Allergic to Other People.”

At such moments, one could be forgiven for thinking that he or she had somehow joined the universe of the film Blade Runner, or was acting out a scene in Huxley’s Brave New World, where soma is so ubiquitous that it’s taken at the slightest distress, to inoculate us. But this is our world and culture in 2010. And the real and depressing outcome of such distortions, the New England Journal of Medicine discovered in January 2008, was that the entire 18-year history of SSRI antidepressants had been skewed by the false reporting and proven underreporting of negative data. Whole clinical trials buried at the back of filing cabinets, never to see the light of day because the outcomes didn’t suit the outcome wanted by the pharmaceutical house in question, which was in effect paying to have its own product assessed. On the basis of this very recent past, and on the backs of such questionable science, we have medicated millions of people around the world.

 

Christopher Lane, author of Shyness: How Normal Behavior Became a Sickness (Yale trade, 2007).

(Source: europsychoanalysis.eu)

— 3 years ago with 7 notes
#Avoidant Personality Disorder  #Christopher Lane  #Mental Disorders  #New Yorker  #Normal  #Shyness  #blade runner  #dsm  #health  #saude  #saúde mental  #sickness  #New England Journal of Medicine  #anxiety  #depression 
Depression, Culture and Genetics →

Horwitz: Depression is probably one of the very few mental illnesses that’s been recognized for thousands of years, so it’s certainly not something that’s a new condition. From the ancient Greek philosophers, through the renaissance period, through the early psychiatrists, even through Sigmund Freud and the DSM I and the DSM II  – it had always been a contextualized illness so that the people who become sad or even intensely sad in contexts where we would expect people to be sad – the loss of intimates, diagnoses of a serious physical condition, serious economic difficulties- these sorts of things were always clearly distinguished from the mental illness of depression, which either arises with no context or persists longer than the original context in which it arose or features extremely severe symptoms- vegetative symptoms, hallucinations and delusions, these sorts of things.

Interviewer: So you’re saying that there’s been this historical legacy of seeing depression as a pathology only when it doesn’t fit the context, when it doesn’t fit the situation.

Horwitz: Precisely, the symptoms are identical but one is contextually appropriate and the other is without cause or without reason.

Link to a podcast interview with sociologist Allan Horwitz, author of a book called The Loss of Sadness.

— 3 years ago with 2 notes
#Allan Horwitz  #Depression  #pathology  #psychiatric  #sociologist  #depressão