The conjectural science of the subject

Closed From Now On!
Thanks to the followers & Tumblr friends I made.
 @_ViniciusMR
When I speak, I do not know what I am going to say.

Closed From Now On!

Thanks to the followers & Tumblr friends I made.

 @_ViniciusMR

When I speak, I do not know what I am going to say.

— 2 years ago with 14 notes
#closed  #I already said enough on my tumblr 

Fé Cega, Faca Amolada

Artist: Milton Nascimento

Album: Minas (1975)

— 2 years ago with 21 notes
#fé cega faca amolada  #milton nascimento  #minas  #1975 
"When we are dealing with a truly great philosopher the real question to be raised concerns not what this philosopher may still tell us, what he may still mean to us, but rather the opposite, namely, what we are, what our contemporary situation might be, in his eyes, how our epoch would appear to his thought."
Slavoj Zizek - First as Tragedy, Then as Farce.

(Source: laprostitution, via discrypt-deactivated20111124)

— 2 years ago with 18 notes
#Slavoj Zizek  #philosophie  #filosofia 

De Volta à Terra Boa (Back To The Good Land).

English, French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese subtitles.

— 2 years ago with 5 notes
#Back To The Good Land  #brazil  #indian  #Civilization and Its Discontents  #mal-estar  #malaise dans la civilization 
How Psychoanalysis Works

“How Psychoanalysis Works”. This is not a question, this is an assertion. Because psychoanalysis indeed works, contrary to what some noisily object o nowadays. Still, we need to account for it.

The word ‘work’ (opèrer), used in an intransitive way, is a strong word. Coming from the Latin ‘operari’, which means ‘to work’, ‘to operate’ or ‘operation’, it involves an action that produces an effect, an “ordered sequence of acts that effect a transformation” (according to ‘Le Robert’). To say it in a matter of fact way: psychoanalysis changes something, it yields results. By what means and with what aim is what we will show.

At the end of his teaching, Lacan said that for all these years he did not stop questioning his ‘co-practitioners’ “on the subject of knowing how they could possibly operate with words – I don’t say cure, one does not cure everybody. There are operations that are effective and that only happen with words.”(1) The power of the word was also what Freud, inventor of psychoanalysis, patiently gave account of to the supposed ‘impartial person’ who did not know anything of the ‘peculiarities of an analytic treatment’, whom he addressed in 1926 on Lay Analysis. The specific use of words in the meeting of a psychoanalyst with his patient is neither suggestion nor magic. The way words are used cannot be captured by other practices or any previous knowledge. Freud says: “analysis is a procedure sui generis, something novel and special, which can only be understood with the help of new insights - or hypotheses, if that sounds better.”(2) Freud considered that the hypothesis of the unconscious and the importance of sexuality in the determination of neurosis were the two ‘cornerstones’ of psychoanalytic theory, deduced from the experience.(3)

To give our own account of how psychoanalysis works today, let us start from what our daily practice teaches us. Let us not hesitate to take things from the level of the phenomena. Let us ask ourselves what in a given case took place and what was at work. By doing this we will prove that this ‘how’ neither goes back to, nor culminates in a practical guide that prescribes procedures to follow for foreseeable and generalisable results. We verify again, as at the Congress of the WAP in 2004, that Lacanian practice is without standards, but that it is for all that not without principles.

In order to orient ourselves, let us return to the ‘fundamental concepts of psychoanalysis’, as Lacan chose them from Freud in 1964, to revive them. Seminar XI is a very particular moment in his teaching, a rupture and a new departure, the stakes of which have often been illuminated by Jacques-Alain Miller. Lacan puts a series of four concepts in order: the unconscious, repetition, transference and the drive, with which he responds to the question of what founds psychoanalysis as ‘praxis’ (4), by speaking to an extended audience beyond the psychoanalysts who followed his teaching at that point.

For the unconscious to speak it needs someone who listens to it, said Jacques-Alain Miller in London, at the ‘Rally of the Impossible Professions’. A psychoanalyst distances himself from the dominant contemporary ideologies who do not believe in the unconscious.(5) He is interested in the things that are wrong, that fail, that defy mastery, and of which Lacan made the manifestation of the truth of a subject. This unconscious that ‘opens and closes’, that presents itself as hindrance and failure, how is it gotten hold of? How do we offer the possibility of surprise by proposing this special mode of speaking that is free association? What is our responsibility in an interpretation?

Repetition, in its insistence, is the missed encounter with the real, with what is inassimilable in the signifier, with what Freud called trauma. How do we bear it?

This real is at play in transference, in as much as it is defined as ‘enactment of the reality of the unconscious’, which is sexual. What place do we occupy in transference? What function do we have in it?

The drive circles the lost object, the object a, and yields in this same circuit its satisfaction; this is in no way equivalent to the good of the subject. The analytic operation allows the subject to detach himself from the identifications he was subjected to, and to recognise the jouissance that is his own. Under which conditions is this possible?

These basic concepts, says Lacan, are “what makes us certain of our practice”.(6) But there is something more. The whole seminar is traversed by the initial question: “What must there be in the analyst’s desire for it to operate in a correct way?” Contrary to the discourse of science, where the desire of the physician is not questioned, “the analyst’s desire can in no way be left outside our question”.(7) This desire is the spring of the operation. Lacan will respond in 1967 with the formalisation of the end of analysis and his concept of the act of the psychoanalyst. Thus, to the question of what could put someone in the position to support the analytic act he responded that a psychoanalyst is the product of his analysis, taken to its end.(8)

Anne Lysy

(1) Lacan, J.; « Le phénomène lacanien », conférence à Nice (30.11.1974), in Cahiers cliniques de Nice, 1 June 1998, p. 14. (not translated/published in English)

(2) Freud, S.; The Question of Lay Analysis [1926], Standard Edition (SE) vol 20, trad. Strachey, J., Hogarth Press, London, p.189/190

(3) Freud, S.; On The History of the Psychoanalytic Movement [1914], SE 14, p.16

(4) Lacan, J.; The Seminar, Book XI, The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis, tr. Sheridan, A., Penguin, London 1994, p. 6

(5) Miller, J.-A.; ‘Closing Remarks at the Rally of the Impossible Professions, Against the False Promises of Security’, in Hurly-Burly, issue 1, 2009, p. 211

(6) Op.cit, p. 263

(7) Ibid.; p. 9 + 10

(8) Lacan, J.; Proposition of 9 October 1967 on the Psychoanalyst of the School (Autres écrits, Paris, Seuil, 2001, pp. 243-259) published in English on the website of the London Society, tr. Grigg, R.: http://www.londonsociety-nls.org.uk/pdfs/Propositionof9October1967.pdf

— 2 years ago with 24 notes
#How Psychoanalysis Works  #Anne Lysy  #freud  #wap 
PLEASE READ AND SIGN!!

The  chief Raoni cries when he learns that brazilian president Dilma  released the beginning of construction of the hydroelectric plant of  Belo Monte, even after tens of thousands of letters and emails addressed  to her and which were ignored as the more than 600,000 signatures. That  is, the death sentence of the peoples of Great Bend of the Xingu river  is enacted. Belo Monte will inundate at least 400,000 hectares of  forest, an area bigger than the Panama Canal, thus expelling 40,000  indigenous and local populations and destroying habitat valuable for  many species - all to produce electricity at a high social, economic and  environmental cost, which could easily be generated with greater  investments in energy efficiency.

It was brought to my attention that there is a petition we all can sign to help support these indigenous people and the Amazon. Please take a second to check it out below or comparable petitions that are available. Thank you.

http://amazonwatch.org/take-action/stop-the-belo-monte-monster-dam

PLEASE READ AND SIGN!!

The chief Raoni cries when he learns that brazilian president Dilma released the beginning of construction of the hydroelectric plant of Belo Monte, even after tens of thousands of letters and emails addressed to her and which were ignored as the more than 600,000 signatures. That is, the death sentence of the peoples of Great Bend of the Xingu river is enacted. Belo Monte will inundate at least 400,000 hectares of forest, an area bigger than the Panama Canal, thus expelling 40,000 indigenous and local populations and destroying habitat valuable for many species - all to produce electricity at a high social, economic and environmental cost, which could easily be generated with greater investments in energy efficiency.

It was brought to my attention that there is a petition we all can sign to help support these indigenous people and the Amazon. Please take a second to check it out below or comparable petitions that are available. Thank you.

http://amazonwatch.org/take-action/stop-the-belo-monte-monster-dam

(via ex-intimo)

— 2 years ago with 33638 notes
#petition for the amazon forest  #Belo Monte  #indians 
"Herein lies the paradox proper to capitalism, its last resort: capitalism is capable of transforming its own limit, its own impotence, in the source of power—the more it ‘putrifies,’ the more its immanent contradiction is aggravated, the more it must revolutionize itself to survive."
Slavoj Žižek, The Sublime Object of Ideology (via velvetrobots)

(via eachandeveryandall)

— 2 years ago with 23 notes

Bat Macumba

Artist: Gilberto Gil, Caetano Veloso

Album: Tropicalia (1968)

— 2 years ago with 74 notes
#tropicalia  #bat macumba  #gilberto gil  #caetano veloso  #1968 
The Epidemic of Mental Illness: Why? by Marcia Angell | The New York Review of Books →

It seems that Americans are in the midst of a raging epidemic of mental illness, at least as judged by the increase in the numbers treated for it. The tally of those who are so disabled by mental disorders that they qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) increased nearly two and a half times between 1987 and 2007—from one in 184 Americans to one in seventy-six. For children, the rise is even more startling—a thirty-five-fold increase in the same two decades. Mental illness is now the leading cause of disability in children, well ahead of physical disabilities like cerebral palsy or Down syndrome, for which the federal programs were created.

A large survey of randomly selected adults, sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and conducted between 2001 and 2003, found that an astonishing 46 percent met criteria established by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) for having had at least one mental illness within four broad categories at some time in their lives. The categories were “anxiety disorders,” including, among other subcategories, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); “mood disorders,” including major depression and bipolar disorders; “impulse-control disorders,” including various behavioral problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); and “substance use disorders,” including alcohol and drug abuse. Most met criteria for more than one diagnosis. Of a subgroup affected within the previous year, a third were under treatment—up from a fifth in a similar survey ten years earlier.

Nowadays treatment by medical doctors nearly always means psychoactive drugs, that is, drugs that affect the mental state. In fact, most psychiatrists treat only with drugs, and refer patients to psychologists or social workers if they believe psychotherapy is also warranted. The shift from “talk therapy” to drugs as the dominant mode of treatment coincides with the emergence over the past four decades of the theory that mental illness is caused primarily by chemical imbalances in the brain that can be corrected by specific drugs. That theory became broadly accepted, by the media and the public as well as by the medical profession, after Prozac came to market in 1987 and was intensively promoted as a corrective for a deficiency of serotonin in the brain. The number of people treated for depression tripled in the following ten years, and about 10 percent of Americans over age six now take antidepressants. The increased use of drugs to treat psychosis is even more dramatic. The new generation of antipsychotics, such as Risperdal, Zyprexa, and Seroquel, has replaced cholesterol-lowering agents as the top-selling class of drugs in the US

— 2 years ago with 12 notes
#American Psychiatric Association  #US  #drugs  #mad  #mental illness  #psychosis  #drogas  #pharma  #depressao 
Salvo contadas excepciones, durante todo el siglo XVI la locura fue competencia de exorcistas e inquisidores; sin embargo, las interpretaciones que sobre ella se pergeñaron no siempre tuvieron resonancias negativas. En términos generales, bien puede decirse que hasta el siglo XVII las alteraciones psíquicas, especialmente los estados melancólicos, se relacionaron con la posesión demoníaca y la brujería; dicha relación fue asimismo asumida y defendida por el discurso médico.
La locura “sagrada”, también llamada “delírio religioso”, se consideró una consequencia de la “posesión divina”. En este sentido, las cuatro categorias de “furor” (poético, místico, profético y amoroso) propuestas por el neoplatonismo florentino se vincularon todas ellas con la sabiduría. Asimismo, se incluyeron dentro de este “delírio religioso” aquellos comportamientos o actuaciones realizados por personas que se imaginaban “instrumentos de Dios”; en muchos de esos casos se trataba probablemente de cuadros histéricos con convulsiones, éxtasis, temblores e, incluso, automutilaciones.
Las posesiones demoníacas se manifestaban también en alteraciones de la conducta, pseudodelirios, cuadros convulsivos y, de manera específica, en el marco de la melancolía; en este último caso, se suponía que la intervención diabólica obedecía a aumento de la bilis negra - humor seco y húmedo - que terminaría por consumir al afectado. 
Más que ninguna otra, las creencias y los elementos simbólicos sirvieron en esta época para explicar la naturaleza de la locura. En este sentido, la popular “piedra de la locura” concitó un buen numero de interpretaciones concretas de la patologia mental; muchas de ellas la representaron como un objeto material que había que expulsar o extraer. El origen de la creencia puede estar en las sangrías practicadas en las venas de la frente o en las trepanaciones craneales. Mas conviene recordar, no obstante, que esa concepción popular motivaba también algunas criticas, como la que se desprende del famoso cuadro de Brueghel en el que se representa la extracción de la piedra de locura: al cargar su pintura de simbolos sarcásticos, Brueghel parece enfatizar que esas extracciones constituian maniobras proprias de charlatanes. Por lo demás, las peregrinaciones a lugares determinados, las procesiones de danzantes o la existencia de santos - o sus reliquias - capaces “curar” la locura estuvieron, lógicamente, asociadas a interpretaciones del mal surgidas todas ellas del estrambótico magma de intereses en el que se sentaban las creencias del incipiente Mundo Moderno.
Cuadro de Pieter Brueghel (tema: la extracción de la piedra de la locura)
Artículo de José Maria Alvaréz.

Salvo contadas excepciones, durante todo el siglo XVI la locura fue competencia de exorcistas e inquisidores; sin embargo, las interpretaciones que sobre ella se pergeñaron no siempre tuvieron resonancias negativas. En términos generales, bien puede decirse que hasta el siglo XVII las alteraciones psíquicas, especialmente los estados melancólicos, se relacionaron con la posesión demoníaca y la brujería; dicha relación fue asimismo asumida y defendida por el discurso médico.

La locura “sagrada”, también llamada “delírio religioso”, se consideró una consequencia de la “posesión divina”. En este sentido, las cuatro categorias de “furor” (poético, místico, profético y amoroso) propuestas por el neoplatonismo florentino se vincularon todas ellas con la sabiduría. Asimismo, se incluyeron dentro de este “delírio religioso” aquellos comportamientos o actuaciones realizados por personas que se imaginaban “instrumentos de Dios”; en muchos de esos casos se trataba probablemente de cuadros histéricos con convulsiones, éxtasis, temblores e, incluso, automutilaciones.

Las posesiones demoníacas se manifestaban también en alteraciones de la conducta, pseudodelirios, cuadros convulsivos y, de manera específica, en el marco de la melancolía; en este último caso, se suponía que la intervención diabólica obedecía a aumento de la bilis negra - humor seco y húmedo - que terminaría por consumir al afectado. 

Más que ninguna otra, las creencias y los elementos simbólicos sirvieron en esta época para explicar la naturaleza de la locura. En este sentido, la popular “piedra de la locura” concitó un buen numero de interpretaciones concretas de la patologia mental; muchas de ellas la representaron como un objeto material que había que expulsar o extraer. El origen de la creencia puede estar en las sangrías practicadas en las venas de la frente o en las trepanaciones craneales. Mas conviene recordar, no obstante, que esa concepción popular motivaba también algunas criticas, como la que se desprende del famoso cuadro de Brueghel en el que se representa la extracción de la piedra de locura: al cargar su pintura de simbolos sarcásticos, Brueghel parece enfatizar que esas extracciones constituian maniobras proprias de charlatanes. Por lo demás, las peregrinaciones a lugares determinados, las procesiones de danzantes o la existencia de santos - o sus reliquias - capaces “curar” la locura estuvieron, lógicamente, asociadas a interpretaciones del mal surgidas todas ellas del estrambótico magma de intereses en el que se sentaban las creencias del incipiente Mundo Moderno.

Cuadro de Pieter Brueghel (tema: la extracción de la piedra de la locura)

Artículo de José Maria Alvaréz.

— 2 years ago with 26 notes
#XVI  #alvarez  #brueghel  #edad media  #locura  #patologias  #piedra de la locura  #psicoanalisis  #psiquiatria  #loucura  #doença  #histeria 
MONSIEUR VALABREGA: A third notion, due to Fechner, the psychic locality of the dream being different from the locality of the representation of waking life. There follows the construction of the psychic apparatus. This apparatus is constituted of various systems, which one doesn’t have to, Freud tells us, give a spatial order, but rather an order of temporal succession.

As a consequence, one musn’t believe in the spatiality of the schema. It is a temporal topography. This is the first schema of the apparatus. It possesses a direction—the psychical process always goes from the perceptual extremity, Pcpt. to M., the motor. Immediately after, there’s a first differentiation. The perceptual excitations received by the subject must leave a trace there, a memory.

Now, the Pcpt. system, perception has no memory whatsoever. One must therefore distinguish between a Mnem’. system and the Pcpt. system. When there have been simultaneous perceptions, there will be a simultaneous connection of the traces—that is the phenomenon of association.

But there exist other connections than the associative one. So it therefore becomes necessary to allow for several Mnem. systems-Mnem, Mnem’, Mnem”, etc. It would be pointless. Freud says, to try to determine the number, or even wish to do so. Consider the diagram.

The text is really rather pithy—The first of these Mnem. systems will naturally contain the record of association in respect to simultaneity in time; while the same perceptual material will be arranged in the later systems in respect to other kinds of coincidence, so that one of these later systems, for instance will record relations of similarity, and so on with the others.

—Valabrega’s Presentation of the psychic apparatus in The Interpretation of Dreams. 2 March 1955, Lacan’s second year of seminars at Sainte-Anne Hospital ‘54-‘55

MONSIEUR VALABREGA: A third notion, due to Fechner, the psychic locality of the dream being different from the locality of the representation of waking life. There follows the construction of the psychic apparatus. This apparatus is constituted of various systems, which one doesn’t have to, Freud tells us, give a spatial order, but rather an order of temporal succession.

As a consequence, one musn’t believe in the spatiality of the schema. It is a temporal topography. This is the first schema of the apparatus. It possesses a direction—the psychical process always goes from the perceptual extremity, Pcpt. to M., the motor. Immediately after, there’s a first differentiation. The perceptual excitations received by the subject must leave a trace there, a memory.

Now, the Pcpt. system, perception has no memory whatsoever. One must therefore distinguish between a Mnem’. system and the Pcpt. system. When there have been simultaneous perceptions, there will be a simultaneous connection of the traces—that is the phenomenon of association.

But there exist other connections than the associative one. So it therefore becomes necessary to allow for several Mnem. systems-Mnem, Mnem’, Mnem”, etc. It would be pointless. Freud says, to try to determine the number, or even wish to do so. Consider the diagram.

The text is really rather pithy—The first of these Mnem. systems will naturally contain the record of association in respect to simultaneity in time; while the same perceptual material will be arranged in the later systems in respect to other kinds of coincidence, so that one of these later systems, for instance will record relations of similarity, and so on with the others.

—Valabrega’s Presentation of the psychic apparatus in The Interpretation of Dreams. 2 March 1955, Lacan’s second year of seminars at Sainte-Anne Hospital ‘54-‘55

(Source: primaryprocess)

— 2 years ago with 11 notes
#freud  #Interpretation of Dreams  #construction of the psychic apparatus 
"Lacan used to say, ‘To love is to give what you haven’t got.’ Which means: to love is to recognize your lack and give it to the other, place it in the other. It’s not giving what you possess, goods and presents, it’s giving something else that you don’t possess, which goes beyond you. To do that you have to assume your lack, your ‘castration’ as Freud used to say. And that is essentially feminine. One only really loves from a feminine position. Loving feminises. That’s why love is always a bit comical in a man. But if he lets himself get intimidated by ridicule, then in actual fact he’s not very sure of his virility."
JAM - On Love.

(Source: zizekbadioujam)

— 2 years ago with 57 notes
#to love is to give what you haven’t got  #miller  #lacan  #feminine  #man  #viril